SNOW REMOVAL FAQ'S

SCA road and snow removal crews would like to help as much as they can by picking up their blades for those who are disabled during snow removal.  


For more information CLICK HERE

The SCA has a five man roads department and five trucks with plows. SCA also contracts with outside snow removal vendors when their help is needed, so that we do not employ a roads person year round when they are only needed during snow removal, to save on costs.  Spring Creek encompasses almost 25 square miles with 150 miles of road. To put this in perspective, there are about 25 miles of parkways that need four passes to complete, in turn, there are about 100 lane miles on just the parkways. That leaves 125 miles of other roads which take at least two passes, in turn about 250 lane miles with plows able to run between 10-20 miles an hour depending on conditions. Also remember, when there is heavy snow, these main roads and parkways may need to be repeated. We also have the roads to our amenities, parking lots, schools, mailboxes, etc. Add to that the time it takes to reload with salt and sand, time to fuel their trucks and travel to the area they are assigned and you can understand why it takes time to get the roads cleared.

When it snows, the road crews, and others on our staff with CDL’s work 12 hour shifts split between nights and days.  They frequently get called in after they have already put in a day’s work.  When conditions warrant, they work right through weekends and holidays to keep the roads clear and open.  It is not at all uncommon for the crew to work two weeks without a day off, many of the days are 12 hour days.

Equipment breakdowns may prevent us from using a full crew at all times. Almost all of our equipment is 30+ years old so you can imagine the issues we face each and every storm.

 
QUICK REMINDERS:

  • Please DO NOT park on the sides of the roads before, during, or after a snow storm.
  • Please remind children to stay off of the roads especially at night if they are playing in the snow. We have had a few close calls with children running or being in the road at night during a storm and we did not see them right away.
  • Our plows will try our best not to throw snow on people who may be outside plowing, shoveling or at bus stops.
  • When driving near a plow, please stay FAR behind the plow to avoid any damage.
  • We try not to put snow in driveways and this can certainly be frustrating, although at times this is hard to avoid. Please refer to our diagram regarding pushing snow out of your driveway below.
  • If it is a heavy snow, we typically will hit parkways, bus routes then other roads. Typically we will not fully clean a cul-de-sac on the first go around but will make a path in and out. We also try to make an in and out lane on each road and will clean up “pies” during the cleanup phase of snow removal.
  • Wind certainly is a factor when plowing snow. We may not get to roads quickly depending on the wind and how it is affecting the main and bus routes. There have been times we had to just stay on the mains for days because of the wind, drifting snow and way the storm was coming in.
  • We will try and hit the mailbox pads as we go by them as time allows, making a path also.
  • Please DO NOT plow across the roads. Refer to the diagram on how and where to plow. This can cause major issues for the plows and damage equipment.


What can you do during a snow event?

1.If possible, do not travel on the roads during a storm.  Wait until the roads have been cleared.

2.When you have to travel on snow-covered roads, drive slowly and use caution.

3.Do not attempt to drive through deep snow drifts. 

4.If you have the choice, use four-wheel drive vehicles rather than two-wheel drives.

5.If you do get stuck, try to get your vehicle removed as soon as possible. Call us if we can help.

6.Do not park on the roads. This prevents the plows from getting the roads cleared.

7.If a storm is severe enough for school to be closed, please keep children out of and away from the roads.

8.Do not push snow from your driveway into the roads or across the road.  When snow is pushed onto the road and across the road but remains in the path of a snow plow, it can injure drivers and severely damage plows.  It is a major jolt when trucks hit a frozen pile of snow.

 

Why does the snow plow go down the street with the plow up?

  •   In a snowfall less than two inches, main and secondary roads will not be plowed but will have salt/sand applied at intersections, hills, and           curves.
  •    Each plow vehicle has their designated route throughout the Association.  We do not plow to and from routes.
  •   The plow could be traveling back to the shop for repairs.
  •   The plow could be traveling to get a refill of salt/sand.
  •   The plow is traveling back to its route after a refill or repair.



When do you plow?

  •   When a snowfall of greater than two inches has accumulated, the Roads Supervisor will authorize an action plan for general plowing.
  •   When snowfall of less than two inches has accumulated, salt and/or plowing may be utilized.  Primary roads and parkways may be completely cleared of snow and salt/sand applied.  Secondary roads will not be plowed but will have salt/sand applied at intersections, hills and curves.


 Why is my street always last to be plowed?

  Intensity, duration and timing of the snow event present unique challenges and may result in longer times than anticipated before we are able to remove the snow from every street.  The Association has to clear and maintain over 150 miles of roads. In comparison, the City of Elko has about 100 miles. To put this in perspective, there are about 25 miles of parkways that need four passes to complete, in turn about 100 lane miles just on parkways. That leaves 125 miles of other roads which take at least two passes, in turn about 250 lane miles, with plows able to run between 10-20 miles an hour depending on conditions. As main streets are cleared, we will proceed to the secondary streets and to low volume residential through streets, dead ends and cul-de-sacs. Continued snowfall may require that we return to the main streets or dedicate equipment such that we may experience significant delay in getting to secondary streets. If a snow plow operator finishes their route, they will assist on other routes in order to complete all routes as quickly as conditions allow.
 
Why has the plow left a large amount of snow in my driveway so that I can’t get my car out?  When will they come to clean It up?
  Our goal is to clear the roadway for safe travel.  Unfortunately, snow deposited in your driveway is an inconvenient result of plowing. The greater the snowfall, the greater the amount of snow plowed into your driveway at times.  Crews will not remove snow from the end of private driveways. Adjacent property owners are responsible for clearing the snow to gain access to the roadway.  While some property owners may think the snow from the entire width of the street has been deposited at the end of their driveway, please be assured that snow plow operators do their best to make sure everyone receives the same amount of snow.  We regret the inconvenience.

 Why can’t we push snow onto the road from our driveways or across the roads?
 Shoveling snow into the roads from vehicles and private driveways is strictly prohibited and against the Association rules and regulations. It only makes the situation worse for everyone. This can also cause equipment breakdowns as well as accidents and make the property owner who pushed the snow on the road liable. Please use discretion.

 Can my vehicle be on the side of the road during snow?
  When heavy snowfalls are predicted, residents are asked, where possible, not to park on the roads. This is done to reduce the chance of blocking in parked vehicles, eliminate the chance of damaging vehicles and allow for a more efficient plowing operation.

 Why does the plow not remove all of the snow from my road?
 The plows are designed to “float” on the roads using the weight of the blade. This is done to prevent damage to both the vehicle and road infrastructure. There may be an expectation to see blacktop when driving during snow events, although please understand, this typically will not be the case. We also ask that residents drive slowly as these wintery conditions can cause slippery roads.

 I live in a cul-de-sac, can we pile our snow in the middle of the circle?
 No. Piling the snow in the middle of the circle will not get the cul-de-sac removed any quicker and will lead to icy patches when the snow melts during the day and refreezes as temperatures drop overnight. It will also create a hazardous condition when the plows come through in subsequent storms as the drivers cannot see if children are playing in the snow pile.

 Why do I never see a truck when it snows?
 Depending upon the time of day, traffic volumes and snowfall amounts, the average parkways can take between 4 and 6 hours to complete. Plowing operations will require at least 12 to 24 hours after the end of the storm depending on snow amount totals and duration. The trucks will continue back over these main routes until the storm has stopped and these streets are clear of snow or ice.

 Why don’t you plow to the center of the street? 
 Plowing snow to the center of the street can be very hazardous to motorists: traffic flow is restricted by eliminating a portion of a lane; the constant freeze/thaw cycle rapidly deteriorates the pavement; and icy driving conditions are created when the melting snow freezes on the pavement every night. This practice can also create sight obstructions for vehicles, and cause problems for residents entering and exiting roadways. The SCA has a five man roads department and five trucks with plows. SCA also contracts with outside snow removal vendors when their help is needed, so that we do not employ a roads person year round when they are only needed during snow removal, to save on costs.  Spring Creek encompasses almost 25 square miles with 150 miles of road. To put this in perspective, there are about 25 miles of parkways that need four passes to complete, in turn, there are about 100 lane miles on just the parkways. That leaves 125 miles of other roads which take at least two passes, in turn about 250 lane miles with plows able to run between 10-20 miles an hour depending on conditions. Also remember, when there is heavy snow, these main roads and parkways may need to be repeated. We also have the roads to our amenities, parking lots, schools, mailboxes, etc. Add to that the time it takes to reload with salt and sand, time to fuel their trucks and travel to the area they are assigned and you can understand why it takes time to get the roads cleared.

When it snows, the road crews, and others on our staff with CDL’s work 12 hour shifts split between nights and days.  They frequently get called in after they have already put in a day’s work.  When conditions warrant, they work right through weekends and holidays to keep the roads clear and open.  It is not at all uncommon for the crew to work two weeks without a day off, many of the days are 12 hour days.

Equipment breakdowns may prevent us from using a full crew at all times. Almost all of our equipment is 30+ years old so you can imagine the issues we face each and every storm.

SCA Blue Reflector Program

Call Us:  +1.775.753.6295

Spring Creek Association